Five HR Tidbits for Monday

by Michael Haberman on November 23, 2015 · 3 comments


News items in HR to pay attention to.

News items in HR to pay attention to.

Here are some items I noted in my reading that I thought had some importance but at this time do not warrant a full blown blog post;

  1. In a surprising announcement the US Department of Labor announced that the final regulations on the changes in the definition of exempt employees would not be released until late 2016. Most of us expected early 2016 and implementation by mid-2016. I wonder if they are trying to bury these changes in the news of the Presidential election in order to lessen the impact?
  2. Some states and municipalities, bolstered by union influence are trying to pass legislation that restricts retail and hospitality employers’ ability to use what is called “predictive scheduling” for their workforces. Under that practice employers use prediction to determine if they are going to have enough demand to require their entire workforce or if the demand is not there to then cancel the employee’s work schedule. Politicians and unions say this is unfair to workers to be told a schedule and then be called to cancel that work time. The legislation demands “on-call” pay in these situations. Currently about 12 states have such legislation being considered.
  3. Did you know that “cross-device tracking” was a thing? The FTC is concerned that companies can track people through the cross connections of several devices owned by one person. The subject of transparency and privacy have been raised. My guess is that this will become more of an issue as the Internet of Things and mobile communication increases. By the way the IoT is supposed to have 28 billion connected devices in the next 5 to 10 years.
  4. The number one safety violations for Fiscal Year 2015 was related to preventing falls, with failure to provide scaffolding number 3. Failure to have a hazard communication program was number 2. Read the entire list here.
  5. Websites are being scrutinized more closely for their compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The most recent target was the NBA who was sued for having a website that could not be accessed by a blind fan.

Although these tidbits were brief that does not diminish their importance. If you are in these areas you need to pay attention.


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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Micole Kaye November 23, 2015 at 9:32 am

Wow, Mike. Number 5 is quite interesting. Do you have any recommendations for how companies can comply with the ADA via websites? Have any other websites had that problem? Thanks for sharing.

Reply

Jon Hyman November 23, 2015 at 11:10 am

A good place to start for website compliance with the ADA is http://www.ada.gov/websites2_prnt.pdf. It focuses on state and local government websites, but it’s just as applicable to commerical websites. I’ve done quite a bit of counseling of companies on this issue from a legal standpoint, and would be happy to assist your organization if you’re looking for some legal guidance.

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Michael Haberman December 2, 2015 at 7:52 pm

See Jon Hyman’s comment. He would be a great source.

Reply

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