Lunch time and the telecommuting employee

by Michael Haberman on July 23, 2013 · 12 comments


This nonexempt employee must be paid for this time working and eating.

This nonexempt employee must be paid for this time working and eating.

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires that nonexempt employees are paid for ALL time worked. It is the tracking of this time that becomes the basis for payment of overtime. The requirement under the FLSA is that nonexempt employees are paid overtime for all hours worked that exceed 40 hours in a week. Seems simple enough, but there are some wrinkles that often cause problems. One of these areas is lunch time and that becomes even more problematic with telecommuting employees.

Some basics

Under the FLSA there actually is no requirement that employers provide a meal time. That varies under state law, but under federal law you do not have to give employees time to eat. That is not necessarily good HR but is often found in 24 hour operations. If you do provide a meal break in order for it to be non-compensated time the employee must be fully relieved of any work duties during that meal break. In an industrial setting that is easier to control because you have the worker move away from the workstation and go to a break room, lunch room or cafeteria to have their meal. In smaller companies and in office situations often you will find someone eating their lunch at their desk.

When eating at a desk the employee may often answer an email or the phone during their meal break. That is fine if the employee is an exempt employee, not so fine if the employee is a nonexempt employee because they have just entered the realm of “not being fully relieved of their duties”. Not being fully relieved means that the time is now compensable. An hour lunch spent working five days a week adds up to five hours of overtime per week or 260 hours per year. That overtime bill can get expensive. The solution to this is that you must make sure that employees remove themselves from their workstation if you are not willing to pay for that overtime. If they stay then it must be recorded as time worked. But what do you do when they are not working in the office.

Telecommuting and the lunch break

If  you have a nonexempt employee who works from home a portion of the week or even the entire week you are responsible for all the work hours the perform. If you have someone who is working on the computer it is an easy trap to fall into of grabbing a sandwich and coming back and sitting at the computer and continuing to work. If they are nonexempt they are then not fully relieved of their duties and that act of eating while at the computer is compensable time.

How to handle

Many companies have tight overtime budgets. So if you are not prepared to pay overtime then you need to have some way to control it. Here are some steps you can take:

  • Have a policy to require all nonexempt employees to take a lunch break away from their workstation unless specifically authorized.
  • Make sure to have a method to be able to track work time; in the case of telecommuters, when they are on the computer and working. You need to have some system to have them sign off for lunch and that no activity is shown on their computer for that specified meal break. You never know when someone may use those computer records against you to show that they worked all those hours and you didn’t pay them for it.
  • Monitor adherence to the policy and deal with discrepancies in a very timely manner.

Of course there are other solutions to this as well. These include:

  • Don’t have nonexempt employees telecommute.
  • Be very careful in your selection of people designated for telecommuting. Make sure they have the work ethic, understand the rules and can be relied on to abide by them.
  • Don your rose colored glasses and don’t worry about it. Keep repeating the mantra “My employees love working here and would never do anything that is not in the best interest of the company.”

Train supervisors

One of the key components in this equation is the supervisor. Companies often get sued not due to the actions of their employees but rather due to the actions of supervisors. Supervisors are the ones that get hammered on overtime budgets. They also have to understand the rules on overtime payment and making sure time is appropriately and accurately recorded. They need to understand that making telecommuter “work off the clock” is as wrong as it is to have someone stay in the office working off the clock.

I know some of this sound Draconian and too much like a “police state.” Unfortunately until the FLSA is amended to catch up to the realities of today’s workers you are still obligated to abide by the current law. So paying overtime as required may add to your budget, but it will not be nearly as bad as paying back pay, lawyer’s fees and fines when you get caught. And the DOL is making it easier for you to get caught.

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{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Shelton Blease July 25, 2013 at 8:25 am

Mike,

This is a great post! One thing that many managers and executives fail to realize is that when an employee files a lawsuit, it is the company that has the burden of proof, so the company must disprove the claim made by the employee. If the employee claims that he/she worked 50 hours each week for their tenure as a non-exempt employee, the company must have the proof to disprove that claim. Therefore, it is important that the company have good record-keeping policies and procedures, and that the supervisors are monitoring the work being performed and when it is being performed.

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Michael Haberman August 21, 2013 at 5:05 pm

Shelton, thanks for pointing out the burden of proof situation. Valuable information.

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Sapience July 29, 2013 at 5:48 am

Great Post. It is indeed very important to track employee time at work these days not only for issues mentioned above, but also at the time of appraisals so that there is documented proof of their performance.

Sapience Employee Time Tracker is a rich tool with advanced functionalities which helps organizations to monitor and audit employee time accurately. This helps companies and clients to review the employees time spent at work and utilise it appropriately

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Andrea Paris August 21, 2013 at 3:39 pm

This is a wonderful post and a good reminder of the exposure that employers have when technology allows employees to “work” any time, any where.

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Michael Haberman August 21, 2013 at 5:04 pm

Thank you Andrea, I appreciate your comment.

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Roberto November 15, 2013 at 10:11 am

telecommuting employee will have to maximize his time in doing his job for this will bring good evaluation during appraisal .

Reply

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